Saturday, April 19, 2008

Did Western Spider Spin Orange Web?

MOSCOW, Russia -- A new book claims to have uncovered the inside story behind Ukraine's Orange Revolution. Written by several international analysts, it accuses the West of having masterminded coups in post-Soviet countries.

Orange Revolution

The book whose title translates as “Orange Webs” is the first publication from a brand new Russian NGO, the Institute of Democracy and Co-operation, which aims to challenge Western views of Russia.

Four years ago thousands poured into Kiev’s Independence Square. Amid claims that the presidential poll was rigged, they demanded victory for their man, Viktor Yushchenko.

Now, a book is out in Russian detailing how the so-called “colour revolutions” were plotted and financed by the West.

“The way they were executed, planned and depicted in the media has one and the same technology behind it,” said Natalya Narochnitskaya, the editor of “Orange Webs.”

Claims that Washington poured millions of dollars into Ukraine’s opposition have already hit the headlines.

“Orange Webs” is a step-by-step guide of the why’s and how’s of a coup d’etat - a process, it claims, that toppled Serbia’s Slobodan Milosevic, lifted Georgia’s Mikhail Saakashvili to power and fuelled Kiev’s rallies.

Analyst John Laughland believes that “to get Ukraine into NATO, you have to have a pro-NATO government installed in power. As the Americans say it’s not rocket science.”

The book points the finger of blame at a number of foreign NGOs. One in particular, the Committee of Voters of Ukraine, is accused of using American money to campaign against the pro-Russian candidate Viktor Yanukovich - allegations it strongly denies.

“The money we received from Western donors was allocated specifically for monitoring the election. After that we haven’t got a penny from anyone,” said Aleksandr Chernenko from the NGO.

Analysts also say many activists from the Ukrainian pro-Yushchenko youth movement ‘Pora’ were trained by members of similar groups in Serbia and Georgia. The movement’s leader, Vladislav Kaskiv, has slammed the claims as pure propaganda.

“The Russian government isn’t interested in democratic changes. That’s why they use information wars to discredit the very idea of change through democratic movement,” he said.

The change was seen by many as a step towards democracy, but for the authors of the book it was an unlawful process.

The authors say they’ve got facts and figures never before made public to prove their point.

“Orange Webs” is now set to hit the shelves. If history is written by the winners, this book tries to provide an alternative account of what drove the revolutions forward.

Source: RussiaToday

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